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Category: Education

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Brexit

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Brexit

My latest post on Wonkhe considers five silver linings for the university sector on Brexit. ” Our sector’s values and culture are not determined by whether laws are made in Brussels, Westminster or Holyrood. Regardless of what deal we leave on, or whether we leave on no deal at all, I’m confident that Britain’s universities will continue to be global, outwardly looking and cosmopolitan places, extending a welcoming hand to people from across the world.”

Wonkhe: The virtues of university giving

Wonkhe: The virtues of university giving

In my latest article for Wonkhe, I set out the moral case for why graduates should seriously consider donating to their university. As it’s a Wonkhe piece, the piece is written for an audience of those who work in the university sector, but the core messages and arguments apply to any graduate who feels they’ve benefited from their education. Read the full piece below: https://wonkhe.com/blogs/the-virtues-of-university-giving/

A follow up on grammar schools

A follow up on grammar schools

My latest Wonkhe piece summarises my recent paper on selective schools for HEPI, addresses some of the critiques and reflects on that fact that, whilst academics don’t need grammar schools for their own children, some seem to be very keen to remove the opportunity to level the playing field for those that do.

Grammar Schools and Progression to Higher Education

Grammar Schools and Progression to Higher Education

My latest paper, published by the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI), looks at the impact of selective schools in ensuring progress to higher education. The Impact of Selective Secondary Education on Progression to Higher Education, HEPI Occasional Paper 19, shows grammar schools increase the likelihood of progression for pupils from the bottom two quintiles of social disadvantage and for Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) pupils. The analysis takes into account both the chances of children from different groups getting into…

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Wonkhe: Student Union Reform

Wonkhe: Student Union Reform

An ‘adversarial collaboration’ between myself and Jim Dickinson goes live on Wonkhe today, debating whether or not student unions are in need of significant reform. I put the case that they are, whilst Jim, one of the best representatives of the student union movement, argues that they’re not. Read the full articles below:

Conservative Home: £9,250 tuition fees: Bad for students, Bad for Society, Bad for the Conservative Party

Conservative Home: £9,250 tuition fees: Bad for students, Bad for Society, Bad for the Conservative Party

In my latest Conservative Home article I set out why a major reduction in university tuition fees (replaced by teaching grant based on the cost to deliver the coursr) isn’t just the right thing to do for public policy reasons, but makes good electoral sense for the Conservatives as well. Read the full article here: Iain Mansfield: £9,250 fees are bad for students, bad for society, and bad for the Conservatives

Wonkhe: Subject TEF

Wonkhe: Subject TEF

My lastest Wonkhe article looks at the latest government updates on subject level TEF, the first major policy release since I was involved. You can read the full article here: An outsider’s view of subject level TEF

Wonkhe: A Hierarchy of Purposes in Higher Education

Wonkhe: A Hierarchy of Purposes in Higher Education

My latest Wonkhe article looks at the various purposes fulfilled by higher education and concludes that it’s time to make receiving a degree conditional upon passing a basic national test in Maths and English. Read the full article here: A hierarchy of purposes in higher education

A Better Secondary School History Curriculum

A Better Secondary School History Curriculum

There are three years of compulsory history in secondary school. That’s just nine terms. If history at primary school is about awakening the love of learning, and more advanced study is about in-depth study and the development of historiographical skills, the best way of using these three years is by ensuring that everyone who goes through them as a broad overview of the sweep of human history and how different historical events and their legacy contribute to making the world…

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