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Category: Education

A follow up on grammar schools

A follow up on grammar schools

My latest Wonkhe piece summarises my recent paper on selective schools for HEPI, addresses some of the critiques and reflects on that fact that, whilst academics don’t need grammar schools for their own children, some seem to be very keen to remove the opportunity to level the playing field for those that do.

Grammar Schools and Progression to Higher Education

Grammar Schools and Progression to Higher Education

My latest paper, published by the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI), looks at the impact of selective schools in ensuring progress to higher education. The Impact of Selective Secondary Education on Progression to Higher Education, HEPI Occasional Paper 19, shows grammar schools increase the likelihood of progression for pupils from the bottom two quintiles of social disadvantage and for Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) pupils. The analysis takes into account both the chances of children from different groups getting into…

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Wonkhe: Student Union Reform

Wonkhe: Student Union Reform

An ‘adversarial collaboration’ between myself and Jim Dickinson goes live on Wonkhe today, debating whether or not student unions are in need of significant reform. I put the case that they are, whilst Jim, one of the best representatives of the student union movement, argues that they’re not. Read the full articles below:

Conservative Home: £9,250 tuition fees: Bad for students, Bad for Society, Bad for the Conservative Party

Conservative Home: £9,250 tuition fees: Bad for students, Bad for Society, Bad for the Conservative Party

In my latest Conservative Home article I set out why a major reduction in university tuition fees (replaced by teaching grant based on the cost to deliver the coursr) isn’t just the right thing to do for public policy reasons, but makes good electoral sense for the Conservatives as well. Read the full article here: Iain Mansfield: £9,250 fees are bad for students, bad for society, and bad for the Conservatives

Wonkhe: Subject TEF

Wonkhe: Subject TEF

My lastest Wonkhe article looks at the latest government updates on subject level TEF, the first major policy release since I was involved. You can read the full article here: An outsider’s view of subject level TEF

Wonkhe: A Hierarchy of Purposes in Higher Education

Wonkhe: A Hierarchy of Purposes in Higher Education

My latest Wonkhe article looks at the various purposes fulfilled by higher education and concludes that it’s time to make receiving a degree conditional upon passing a basic national test in Maths and English. Read the full article here: A hierarchy of purposes in higher education

A Better Secondary School History Curriculum

A Better Secondary School History Curriculum

There are three years of compulsory history in secondary school. That’s just nine terms. If history at primary school is about awakening the love of learning, and more advanced study is about in-depth study and the development of historiographical skills, the best way of using these three years is by ensuring that everyone who goes through them as a broad overview of the sweep of human history and how different historical events and their legacy contribute to making the world…

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Wonkhe: Engaging Effectively

Wonkhe: Engaging Effectively

My latest Wonkhe article – how to engage civil servants effectively. I set out five dos and don’ts for government engagement. You can read the full article below: How to engage civil servants effectively

A New University Ranking

A New University Ranking

Ranking universities by the proportion of entrants who go on to graduate jobs or further study. The  higher education landscape is blessed with many detailed and accurate datasets. Many of the most commonly used sources of data, however, artificially flatter the sector’s performance. For example, the sector’s preferred measure of ‘non-continuation’ only looks at the proportion of  students who don’t continue from the first to the second year – rather than, as one might expect, the proportion that complete (or…

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