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Conservative Home: Three priorities for our next Prime Minister

Conservative Home: Three priorities for our next Prime Minister

In my latest Conservative Home article I set out three priorities for our next Prime Minister: Delivering Brexit by 31 October, with or without a deal. Promoting authentically Conservative values instead of speaking the language of the left. Acting in the interests of ordinary working people, not the metropolitan elite. Of the two candidates standing, I believe Boris Johnson is the best placed to deliver on this, and have voted accordingly – but the article is for the Conservative Party…

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On Communists

On Communists

First they came for the Communists And I did not speak out Because I was not a Communist Then they came for the Socialists And I did not speak out Because I was not a Socialist Then they came for the trade unionists And I did not speak out Because I was not a trade unionist Then they came for the Jews And I did not speak out Because I was not a Jew Then they came for me And…

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Why I’m backing Boris

Why I’m backing Boris

Delivering Brexit by 31 October, championing conservative values and investing in front-line public services – and the only candidate who can stop Corbyn and Farage in the next general election. Delivering Brexit I voted Leave and delivering Brexit is a top priority for me – both for it’s own sake and to deliver on the mandate given by the referendum. We’ve had a stint with a Prime Minister and Chancellor who voted Remain and didn’t really want to leave and…

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The EU wishes to become a nation state

The EU wishes to become a nation state

Here are the aims of the next President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyden. She wants to see “A united states of Europe – run along the lines of the federal states of Switzerland, Germany or the USA.” She wants an EU army: ” “Europe has to build an army,” Wolfgang Clement wrote in this space yesterday. He’s right!” Is she alone? Are these just some aberrant views not shared by other European leaders, who despite this nominated…

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Call for Guest Bloggers

Call for Guest Bloggers

A call for those who’d like to write a guest post for this site. In particular, I would be interested in featuring: 1) Posts on political/economic topics that I think are important to explore, am not opposed to, and interesting enough to what to know more about but not interesting enough to do all the research myself. For example: Universal basic income. Fiscally neutral land value taxes. How to really build more houses without destroying green spaces. Non-hair-shirted ways of…

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Looking along a light-beam

Looking along a light-beam

I’ve recently started reading the Chronicles of Narnia to my eldest child and, even though we are bringing up our children in the Christian faith, I’ve taken a deliberate decision to not explain the Christian symbolism to him. Now, this may simply be a bias on my part. I read the Chronicles myself without any awareness of the hidden meaning(1) and enjoyed them tremendously, an enjoyment that was no way tarnished when I discovered that meaning as a teenager. Also,…

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A History of the World in 100 Pictures

A History of the World in 100 Pictures

I recently read a brilliant children’s non-fiction book by Usborne, A History of the World in 100 Pictures. Last year I suggested that the goal of the compulsory years of the secondary school curriculum should be to give an overview of world history, its drivers and where Britain fits in it (the curriculum was roughly: 1/3 UK, 1/3 Europe, 1/3 the world). A lot of people got very angry at me for suggestion something so ‘elitist’, for thinking that pupils…

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Religious discrimination in Canada

Religious discrimination in Canada

Last week the government of Quebec passed a discriminatory law that would ban the wearing of kippah (skull caps), turbans and hijabs (headscarfs), among other religious symbols, for all public servants in ‘positions of authority’. This includes teachers, police officers, judges and others. At a stroke, this law bars traditional religious people – many of whom may feel morally obliged to wear such symbols – from a large swathe of public life. It is not the case that all religious…

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